Deleuze and Guattari’s Bergson and the Einstein Debate | The Journal of Magnus Opium

| November 4, 2012

Deleuze and Guattari mark out a human body that itself occupies space as an absolute, a body that is in fact involved in an absolute movement. Here, their affirmation of the Vedic conception of the body is essential, for there not only is light one of the elemental substances comprising the body, but all the elements are woven from fibers of light nadis moving in a vortexinal motion. Under these conditions the coordinates of the body are absolute, and time for a person is not the same as the time for an inert mechanical body. This fundamentally alters Einstein’s conception so that the relativity of time does not brush aside the existence of consciousness. One still escapes a gravitational space in order to experience an alteration in time, but here it is accomplished by “motionless voyage.” It is only when consciousness and therefore the experience of duration is thus given absolute status that the Eleatic paradoxes can be overcome for relativity and Einstein’s theory can take on its full significance. The compromise to be struck between relativity and Bergsonism is simple and elegant: the changing durations of time, the experience of time speeding up and slowing down in consciousness is also the very action of time dilation as an effect of the motion of chakras, to which consciousness bears a direct relationship.

via Deleuze and Guattari’s Bergson and the Einstein Debate | The Journal of Magnus Opium.